Where is Mosnews?

Update, April 2009: After almost two years, Mosnews has returned from the dead!

Anyone know what’s up with Mosnews recently?

Mosnews logo

As far as I can tell, they’ve only posted one news story since the beginning of May.

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42 Responses

  1. Aleks says:

    (I just) Died in your Arms (The Cutting crew)???

    I’ve noticed on the top right “a partner project of Gazeta.ru .newsru.com” which I hadn’t seen before (though I might have not just taken note). Maybe this could have something to do with it, as in the ‘partners’ might be squeezing MN or just trying to kill it off. After all, there wasn’t much in the way of sponsorship/advertisements for the site.

  2. That is interesting. I had not even noticed that they stopped publishing weeks ago. Although, I had noticed that their site was really bad about bringing up old news to the top of the page. I think Aleks is right about that being a new logo on the page. Probably just a media consolidation, but how long before the conspiracy theories start?

  3. Lyndon says:

    Clearly another tentacle of the krovavaya gebnya. (just kidding). But it does make you wonder. The Gazeta.ru and News.ru affiliation is definitely new (at least within the past couple of months), because I haven’t seen it before; maybe they’re just taking really long maiskie prazdniki?

  4. I noticed it too. Very strange.

  5. Sean says:

    I remember seeing the Gazeta.ru and News.ru affiliation when I first came upon Mosnews in 2005. But maybe my mind’s playin’ tricks on me. It would be awful is Mosnews is dead. Where would we get all the hilarious Russia stories?

  6. Andy says:

    Where would we get all the hilarious Russia stories?

    I must confess – this was my main concern also…

    I’ve noticed on the top right “a partner project of Gazeta.ru .newsru.com” which I hadn’t seen before

    I think the Gazeta.ru affiliation has been around for a while, but my memory may be playing tricks on me also. I do wonder, though, how they ever manage to make money, so maybe that’s the main reason for the recent lack of activity.

  7. Richard says:

    mosnews in shutting down, why I don’t know. A journalist friend has lost his job there, and all the staff have been laid off.

  8. Andy says:

    That’s really sad news. Mosnews was, when you got past some of the fluffier articles, one of the more useful English language news sites.

    I hope all the staff there manage to find new work.

  9. Lyndon says:

    It is sad indeed. And a bit of playing around with the “way back machine” reveals that Sean and Andy have better memories than I do. Mosnews on March 20, 2005 – with the gazeta.ru affiliation displayed. Dec 1, 2005 – with both gazeta.ru and news.ru displayed. So it can’t be the affiliations that killed it off – those were probably just some sort of banner exchange. In any event, it’s a resource that will be missed. I can’t say I went to read it that much, but it often had hard news in addition to the more frequent hilarious stories, photos of school graduation debauchery, etc. For the Russian readers among you, I recommend Bol’shoi Gorod as a replacement for that new void in the humorous-but-sometimes-serious niche in your media portfolio.

  10. Scott says:

    This is sad news. I checked MosNews weekly. I thought at first I was being blocked because I had an Estonian IP address, and the lack of postings have happened during the whole Bronze Soldier spat, and I have seen MOSNews stories on other wire services.

    I’ll miss it. 🙁

  11. copydude says:

    Speaking of disappearing acts, what happened to Zhe Zhe [dot] us? Must be one of the shortest lived CIS blogs ever.

  12. It was quite active and well promoted as far as FSU Eng. lang. FSU blogs go.

    I’ve come across some FSU Eng. lang. blogs which are quite informative, but seemingly lacking in PR.

    They might constitute a segment in the next QT (Quick Takes), which has been on hiatus.

  13. Sean says:

    In regard to Mosnews’ affiliations, I found this article from 2004 while doing some research yesterday. It appears it was a joint venture between Anton Nosik from Lenta.ru, Gazeta.ru, and the Moscow News.

    I couldn’t find any more information on it shutting down and why.

  14. I’ll send you some info. on someone who will be able to help you on that Sean.

    Meantimme, get a hold of Kirill Pankratov’s “Pigs at the Printing Press” at http://www.exile.ru It gives a good background as to how The Moscow news essentially splintered into factions, which remained located on the same building floor.

    The demise of Mosnews seems to correspind with The Moscow News being bought by RIAN and relocated in the same building housing RTTV, Russia Profile and RIAN.

  15. Amy Boone says:

    Too bad it’s gone, it was a useful resource.

  16. ReluctantMuscovite says:

    There always is http://www.mnweekly.ru 😉

  17. Psychological Projection

    In psychology, psychological projection (or projection bias) is a defense mechanism in which one attributes to others one’s own unacceptable or unwanted thoughts or/and emotions. Projection reduces anxiety by allowing the expression of the unwanted subconscious impulses/desires without letting the ego recognize them.

    Please, don’t pee on my back and tell me it’s raining.

    Yes, the KGB is now called the FSB, just as it was known in Stalin’s time. It is nevertheless the same organization, comprised of the same personnel, utilizing the same methods, pursuing the same goals, only now, instead of sharing power with the Communist Party, this organ of coercion exercises its will entirely unimpeded, brazenly consolidating its power via terror, murder and manipulation.

    I suggest you read the book for which Alexander Litvinenko was murdered for writing. Oh, wait, you can’t. The book is banned in Russia.

  18. The disappearance of the site and all its archives wouldn’t have anything to do with the fact that Russia is a totalitarian state which is run by the KGB, would it? It wouldn’t have anything to do with the new Russian laws which dictate that at least 50% of news reporting in Russia must cast the KGB-run government in a positive light, would it? Naw! It’s probably just that the murder of dozens of journalists, including Anna Politskavaya and Paul Klebnikov, not to mention Alexander Litvinenko, who have been murdered by the KGB in recent years for writing articles and books which expose the truth about the KGB-run government, have served their purpose.

  19. I smell a rat as per the above stated lies.

    The KGB no longer exists and there’s no proof that those folks were killed by the FSB. On the other hand, there’re valid reasons for believing that those individuals could’ve been killed for other reasons not having to do with the Russian government. Klebnikov was a pro-Russian/pro-Putin journalist.

    If I’m not mistaken, the murder rate in Russia is higher than in many Western countries. Journalists can be murdered for reasons not having to do with their work, or reasons having to do with their work, but independent of government involvement.

    As for media biases, one can find plenty of fault with Anglo-American mass media.

  20. Psychological Projection

    In psychology, psychological projection (or projection bias) is a defense mechanism in which one attributes to others one’s own unacceptable or unwanted thoughts or/and emotions. Projection reduces anxiety by allowing the expression of the unwanted subconscious impulses/desires without letting the ego recognize them.

    Please, don’t pee on my back and tell me it’s raining.

    Yes, the KGB is now called the FSB, just as it was known in Stalin’s time. It is nevertheless the same organization, comprised of the same personnel, utilizing the same methods, pursuing the same goals, only now, instead of sharing power with the Communist Party, this organ of coercion exercises its will entirely unimpeded, brazenly consolidating its power via terror, murder and manipulation.

    I suggest you read the book for which Alexander Litvinenko was murdered for writing. Oh, wait, you can’t. The book is banned in Russia.

  21. Noteworthy how you duck the other points made in reply to your initial comments here.

    Is it a fact that Litvinenko’s book is “banned in Russia”?

  22. the British government concluded their investigation of Litvinenko’s murder this spring, and determined that his death was the result of state-sponsored terrorism

    Andrei Lugovoi – not Russia – was charged with murder. He has not been convicted. Of course, he is unlikely to be tried, so we probably won’t ever know a fair outcome. The British press tried and convicted him long before even the investigation was complete.

    But what does the Litvinenko murder or even Putin have to do with Mosnews closing? It is extremely unlikely that there is even a tiny connection. That is like the NY times trying to imply that the death of a journalist who was investigating local illegal street races might have something to do with the Kremlin.

    Although, the link in your signature shows you too be quite the conspiracy buff, so I am not sure that reasoning, logic, or other probable explanations would be useful to you.

  23. Alright then, Mike, let’s have it laid out on the table. For you to actually believe that Yuri Nosenko was a bona fide defector, you would have to believe that Anatoliy Golitsyn was lying to the CIA. Since I am not convinced that you even know who Golitsyn is, why don’t you explain to me why it is that you believe that he was lying to the CIA. A detailed explanation would be a rebuttal of his CIA “handler,” Tennent H. Bagley, and the former head of counter-intelligence at the CIA, James Jesus Angleton, if you’ve ever heard of them.

    Tell me, Mike, how it is that you know that Golitsyn was lying to the CIA, that Nosenko was telling the truth, and that the Russian government positively had nothing to do with the death of Litvinenko.

    Mike, either you are out of your depth, or you are lying on behalf of very bad men.

  24. I am censored. I expected no less.

    The collapse of the Soviet Union was staged, just as Anatoliy Golitsyn said it would be.

  25. Everyone is of course entitled to an opinion.

    The claim was made that Litvinenko’s book is banned in Russia. Is this really true and if so what’s the reason (if stated) given?

  26. Andy says:

    I am censored. I expected no less.

    A couple of your comments were caught in the (sometimes overzealous) spam filter and held for moderation overnight.

    All of these comments have now been moderated and are posted above.

  27. Some of my posts are now appearing, but I notice that it is a selective process.

    As for the reasons that Putin has banned the book, why, they reside in the book itself, which implicates Putin and the rest of the FSB in many, many criminal activities. I don’t believe that the Russian government put out a press release on the subject, but, the proof being in the pudding, I challenge anyone to try to obtain the book on Russian soil. I think you will meet with no small difficulty in doing so. I have sent you the book in Microsoft Word format, Mike, and if you were to read it, there is no doubt that you would be forced to come to the conclusion that what Litvinenko and Felshtinsky wrote was the truth, and that it was because of the book that Litvinenko was killed. To try to pass off the murders of journalists in Russia as something other than the political assassinations that they were makes you either complicit or a fool. You need not remain either.

    I see that another poster has identified me as a conspiracy theorist, and of course I plead guilty. It was Lenin himself, upon founding the Russian Communist party in 1903, who described his fellow charter members (there were 17 of them) as co-conspirators in a criminal enterprise, who would use criminal means to come to power. That they did, and by 1917 his co-conspirators numbered some 20,000, and the whole of Russia fell to this conspiratorial organization. By 1960, more than a billion people lived suffered under their rule, an accomplishment achieved through terror and murder.

    As you must surely know, from the outset the United States was considered the main enemy of the Bolsheviks, and that is just as true today. Lenin hinted that in the late stages of the Revolution it would be necessary to feign democratic reforms in Russia in order to strike the final blow against the only country which stood in the way of the establishment of the “worldwide dictatorship of the proletariat.”

    It was Antonio Gramsci, founder of the Italian Communist Party, writing from his prison cell, who provided the blueprint for the plan that KGB major and defector Anatoliy Golitsyn warned the West about and which was implemented after Stalin’s death. Gramsci’s “long march through the institutions,” accomplished through massive deception, infiltration and diversion, has been so wildly successful, based on the work of Sun Tzu as it is, that it is possible that the Clauswitzian shift in strategy may not be needed, or at least that was the hope of Golitsyn, but it is my belief that this “final phase” will be successful in no other way than the destruction, as per Clauswitz, of 2/3 of the U.S. population, and that is for what the chessboard has been arranged.

    This is the end predicted by Nietzsche. You, Mike, whether wittingly or not, are doing your small part to achieve it.

  28. I apologize for jumping to the conclusion that I was banned from posting, Andy, but it has been my experience at other sites. Would you care to read Litvinenko’s book?

  29. I still didn’t get my inquiry addressed about Litvinenko’s book supposedly being banned in Russia.

  30. “Alexander Litvinenko failed to get Blowing up Russia published during his lifetime. An attempt to publish the book in Russian back-fired when copies were seized and banned by the FSB on the road from Latvia to Moscow. In his foreword, Yuri Felshtinsky pays tribute to his co-author’s courage up to the end of his life and has included the latest investigations he and Litvinenko worked on.”

    http://www.gibsonsquare.com/

    The botched job done by the FSB on Litvinenko cannot reasonably be seen as the result of incompetence, as the dosage of polonium 210 used on him should have been sufficient to cause death within two weeks, and had that been the case, the poison would have been impossible to identify, as it would have decayed to the point where it would have been virtually non-existent. But Litvinenko, due to extraordinary health, lived on for approximately a month after the radioactive material was administered. It was only two hours before he succumbed that the polonium was identified; two hours later, and it would never have been detected.

    I am stressing Litvinenko’s death because it is profoundly important. It is important because now Western intelligence officers, who have been laboring under the false premise that the Soviet collapse was authentic, are now forced to read what Litvienko wrote, and to probe deeper into what has really transpired in Russia. Litvinenko was killed precisely to prevent him from exposing the regime in Russia, and had he died on schedule, the operation would have been a routine success. Now, the cat is out of the bag. Now, the hammer and sickle are once again adorned on the Red Army flag. Now, the path to power taken by Putin is being scrutinized. Now, Putin must take the gloves off, as the deception has been exposed, and no amount of Russian moles (and there are massive amounts of them within Western governments and militiaries) are going to be able to keep the fact that Perestroika and the “collapse” of the Soviet Union were nothing more than a strategic deception.

    Now, war is certain. And the element of surprise is quickly disintegrating, just like the polonium 210 that was used to kill Litvinenko.

    Would you like to see something that will fascinate you? Just go to Youtube and look up the name Yuri Bezmenov.

  31. Andy says:

    Some of my posts are now appearing, but I notice that it is a selective process.

    As well as getting caught in the Spam Karma filter (which has rules specific to this blog), your comments are being caught in the Akismet filter (which operates based on external rules).

    I suspect that you are being caught in the Akismet filter because comments you have made on other blogs have been marked as spam by the authors of those blogs.

    Hopefully you won’t have problems posting comments here in future but, if you do, I’ll manually pick out your comments from the filter, and keep reporting them as ‘not spam’ until Akismet takes notice.

  32. In the US, some folks aren’t allowed entry.

    Puting BS aside:

    Does Litvinenko have a book of any type out? If so, is it actually banned in Russia? If so, what’s the stated reason if any?

  33. Michael, I don’t know what kind of game you’re playing, but, in case you’re wondering why nobody seems to want to pay you for what you write, the time has come for some self-reflection.

    Alexander Litvinenko was murdered for what he wrote, Michael. You know that, and you also know that the book is banned in Russia. You also know how to use a search engine. One more thing you know how to do is ruin what small amount of credibility you had with sophistry.

    I understand that you’re a Putin supporter, and I’ll even give you the benefit of the doubt by saying that you once naively believed that he was a good man who would do good things for Russia, just as so many believed the same about Hitler and what he would do for Germany. But now the gig is up.

  34. The botched job done by the FSB on Litvinenko cannot reasonably be seen as the result of incompetence, as the dosage of polonium 210 used on him should have been sufficient to cause death within two weeks, and had that been the case, the poison would have been impossible to identify, as it would have decayed to the point where it would have been virtually non-existent. But Litvinenko, due to extraordinary health, lived on for approximately a month after the radioactive material was administered. It was only two hours before he succumbed that the polonium was identified; two hours later, and it would never have been detected.

    Let me get this straight… You actually believe that Litvinenko’s physical health actually changed the half life of a radio active material? And his strong health caused the polonium to last longer in his system?

    That is the biggest load of crap that I have read, well, since your previous post about the collapse of the Soviet Union being a part of the Russian plan for world domination.

    Please keep posting because I am finding this humorous.

  35. Many thanks for calling to my attention the fact that I misremembered the details of why it is that we are aware of what and who it was that killed Alexander Litvinenko. I should not have relied on my faulty memory when discussing the subject, and now, I don’t have to, for your astute observation has prompted me to research the topic in some depth. Thank you for that.

    Here is an excerpt from an article which will clarify the situation:

    Oleg Gordievsky, the most senior KGB agent ever to defect to Britain, said they wanted to “demonstrate something new”.[58] Another suggestion by Gordievsky, is that the poisoners were unaware that technology existed to detect traces left by polonium-210: “Did you know that polonium-210 leaves traces? I didn’t. And no one did. (…) what they didn’t know was that this equipment, this technology exists in the West – they didn’t know that, and that was where they miscalculated.”[59]

    Another reason for choosing polonium-210 may have been to suggest the likely involvement of Russia or at least of some state. On the other hand, it is also possible that it was thought the substance would never be detected. Philip Walker, professor of physics at the University of Surrey, commented: “This seems to have been a substance carefully chosen for its ability to be hard to detect in a person who has ingested it.”[60]” http://www.answers.com/topic/alexander-litvinenko-poisoning

    Litvinenko was poisoned on or about November 1. Had he promptly died, as was expected by his Kremlin assassins, there is little likelihood that the public would have been made aware that his death was the result of anything other than the onset of a fast-acting cancer. As it happened, Litvinenko lived long enough to get his story to the press, which published his plight on November 18. It is only because Litvinenko lived long enough to get the press involved that we know what we know today.

    If you doubt what I say, I suggest you click the link provided, and visit the many other sites which provide extensive detail about polonium-210, all of which should be as available to you as they are me, unless of course you reside in a country which restricts access to such information.

  36. It’s no where near as humorous as some other things he has stated.

  37. The information in the article referenced in no way validates your previous allegations. You said that Litvinenko’s great physical health was responsible for for doctors finding the poison because he lived so long. No where does the article mention that. In fact, his own friend said that Polonium was “sadistically designed to trigger a slow, tortuous and spectacular demise” which of course is no where near a fact. You seem to be confusing conjecture with fact.

    Also, to quote your own reference “Polonium-210 is a synthetic element that has a half-life of 138 days as it gradually transforms into lead.” This shows that the detectability had nothing to do with Litvinenko’s “extraordinary health.” Additionally, authorities would not have stopped looking for causes if he died. Have you heard of an autopsy? It would still have been discovered after his death.

    Do you know that your source on Russian technology, Oleg Gordievsky, defected more than 20 years ago? Do you think that he is actually aware of the technology available today in Russia? Also, as a defector he likely has a grudge against Russia, so any information that cannot be validated by other sources is not completely reliable.

    I am not disputing any of the facts of the case — Litvinenko died a horrid death; the cause of which was nearly undiscovered. I only disagree with your speculations that you state as facts. You seem to simply be using this case to support the conspiracy theory that you already believed.

    Ahem, how ’bout that Mosnews? Pity ain’t it.

  38. Litvinenko’s superior health is what enabled him to stay alive long enough to talk to reporters, who then publicized his case. This is what I explained in clear terms in my post which clarified the issue of why it is that the general public is aware of his murder. To reiterate, had Litvinenko died a quick death, the details of his assassination, though they would (most likely, but not assuredly, as deaths from cancer are not ordinarily followed by autopsies) have been investigated, would not have received much, if any, publicity. Again, I made this clear in my previous post, and now that I’ve repeated it, I hope you are able to grasp the concept.

    As for the conjectures about how it was that the Kremlin was caught essentially red-handed assassinating a British citizen on British soil, well, conjecture is conjecture, rumination and nothing more.

    It is plausible that a message was being sent to others, in the most public of ways, not to publicize the crimes of the Kremlin. This would not, after all, be the first time something of this type has been done by the rulers of Russia.

    It is plausible that a message was being sent to the West that the next terrorist attacks are to be nuclear.

    It is plausible that Litvinenko’s death was meant to appear to have been from natural causes, that detection of the polonium-210 was not thought to have been likely or even possible by the assassins because they thought he would die much quicker than he did.

    It is plausible that, given the position of strength (a fact which I will not go into in this post for the reason that it would require, in effect, that I teach you a great deal about the subjects of Russian strategic superiority, strategy, tactics, and other things which I don’t have the time to go into right now) that Russia commands, Russia did not care whether they were caught in the act or not. In other words, Russia is now in a position in which its leaders no longer have to rely on deception, and is free to begin openly bullying the world the same way it does its own population.

    You and certain others here may scoff at the things I have revealed, either because you are in denial, or because you wish to maintain the grand fiction, but to others what I’ve said will be a revelation, and they will begin their own inquiry. They will begin to wonder if they were deceived, if Reagan, Thatcher, and all of the West was deceived. And if they dig a little, they will know that they were, and they will wonder why it is that you are carrying water for murderers.

    Litvinenko was killed because he exposed the fact, in great and convincing detail, that FSB agents, acting on orders from the Kremlin, blew up apartment buildings in Moscow and other cities in order to start two Chechen wars, so that fictional democracy in Russia would bring to power the one of their own, Vladimir Putin.

    Your denials ring hollow.

  39. Olle Larsson says:

    I use to read MosNews several times a week. It was very will written and certainly provided good insight to news events in Russia. Living outside Russia the paper gave me a good feel for Russia’s financial and political climate.

    Sad to see the paper go away.
    Olle Larsson

  40. ReluctantMuscovite says:

    It wasn’t a paper.

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